16 de out. de 2019

La Closerie des Parfums Rose Muscade - English Review


I would argue that brands like Lubin, Jovoy and Le Gallion have inaugurated a specific type of niche that could very well be called a catering niche, classic niche or historical niche. It is a specific category that seeks in the prestige and history of past names a tradition that can be told from modern present perfumes. La Closerie Des Parfums seems to be acting in this direction, although its history of tradition, unlike the aforementioned brands, is difficult to validate and may well be a marketing strategy that pervades the brand.

La Closerie perfumes have the characteristics of today's niche perfumery, trying to add an originality aspect to their concepts. We routinely explore the preciousness of noble natural materials, but organized into olfactory collections, where we currently have one to two of the most popular perfumery raw materials, rose and oud. The idea is to build perfumes that are like gardens for these 2 raw materials, where each member of the collection would be like a different season in this garden. This is done by combining the main material with 1 different spice for each perfume, without a very clear justification as to why. Another peculiarity of the brand is that the collection of perfumes of roses is more expensive than the collection of perfumes of Oud, subverting the traditional logic of the current market.

I can't say that Rose Muscade is a bad scent, but I don't see any specific message in it, how exactly does it ennoble the royal aroma of roses. In fact its scent reminds me too much of a commercial perfume that is very good and fair in price, Cartier Declaration d'un Soir. Rose Muscade is a slightly nobler version of it, putting a better rose in combination with the spicy nutmeg aroma, but maintaining a very similar orchestration around the theme: the velvety, moist touch of cashmeran, a velvety look that can be read as either vetiver or cedar. Perhaps the difference here is a slightly higher emphasis on musks, which give a discreet second skin aroma. I would say that Rose Muscade seems made to please the male audience and that is why more emphasis should be placed on its main protagonist, the rose. The way it is made is not enough for him to actually sell an idea so much more luxurious than Cartier's scent to justify 198 euros in his 100ml bottle.